liberation for all

My current book project is looking at liberation theology for those who are in a context of domination and control, finding meaning through negating or oppressing others.

A lot (certainly not all!) of church work is oriented in a pattern of oppressing, oddly enough.  There is a hiearchy of not only function but also value, where leaders become, essentially, the Spirit for their community, telling people what to think, how to act, where they fit, where they don’t fit.  A few speak, many are silent.  A few are active, many are passive.  Even as this passivity becomes a topic itself of speaking, the passivity is enforced by the models. Rhetoric can only go so far in the face of practices.  Idealized roles become infused with theological priority of ordination, the Word goes forth from a single message or speaker.

Meanwhile, the Spirit always works from below, rising up from the gathered people, many tongues, many voices, the Word most fully an expression of all, the Body infused by the Spirit.  The body of Christ is not many-headed.  There is one head, all the parts together expressing together the movement of God in the midst of a context.  Experiencing this is the experience of liberation. Here’s how I end my first chapter:

We are liberated when we participate with each other in becoming fully who we each are made to be. We liberate when we help others become, we are liberated when we let others participate in our becoming. Thus, liberation happens for the oppressed and the oppressors together, the one taking up as the other lets go, each creating space for the other, resisting the depersonalizing tendencies of social systems as they engage in the truly personalizing movement of the Holy Spirit in their midst.

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