considering liberation of the oppressor

To be liberated, the oppressors need to be themselves understood in their oppressing, and to prevent oppression from returning in another guise, a more holistic construction of human reality should be utilized, lest the formerly oppressed institute new patterns of oppressing once or where they may find advantage.

The European example is noteworthy here, in the United States, Australia, and elsewhere, where immigrants often escaped from patterns of oppression or alienation or punishment, only to impose new patterns of violence and abuse in their new setting.

One stark example may be the involvement of Irish immigrants in expressions of “manifest destiny” (or later in African colonialism).

The English subjugation of Ireland led to attempts to end the native language and culture, pushing such farther West into a restricted zone and resulted in mass starvation as workers were required to grow, and export, cash crops rather than diversify their own food sources.

The mass exodus from Ireland to the United States offered new possibilities, among them a “dream” that saw the West as land to be conquered, with the natives inhabiting them killed, isolated, and forced to adopt the culture of their conquerors in order to live.

This is not, to be sure, a pattern to be solely attributed to the Irish, blaming them (or other such immigrants) for its development. However, their participation in such a repeated pattern shows how limited liberation really seeks to be.

We tend to want freedom for ourselves, not for those who oppress us nor for those who have what we want, often framing an unending cycle of both in the guise of justice.

The immigrants who lost their land in Europe wanted land, and getting land satisfied their assumption of loss, even if the land they got was itself stolen from another.

Such is the history of human civilization and is certainly not limited to the European example, but it is story told in most every culture, and every scale of human interaction. The oppressed need to be freed from their oppression but the danger is that an insufficient form of liberation leads to the oppressed becoming part of new patterns of oppressing.   The man who was once beaten, beats.  The woman who was silenced, silences.  The abused, abuse. The once poor, despise the still poor.  The privileged find it hard to let go the mantle of their former oppression, and lay claim to being victims even as they may be new victimizers.  They are not, then, truly liberated.

Liberation must address both sides, the place of loss and the place of power, because both serve to dehumanize people, and often the same person in different ways.

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